art with code

2017-09-14

Users for sale

Think of this business model for a bit. A company pays you to use their product. To subsidise manufacturing the product, the company sells you to the highest bidder.

This will completely screw up the market for the product.

If you want to compete in the market, you can't compete on price. You have to offer a higher-quality product for free or even pay more than the competition to the users to attract them to your product. At the same time, you can't make as much money as the incumbent because you don't have as many slaves to sell, and you can't get as much money per slave because you need to compete on price (and likely the quality of your slaves and your knowledge of their best use is lacking due to you being new to this).

But, I hear you say, surely this isn't slavery. And yes, it's a very chilled out form of slavery. The company pays you with digital tobacco. All you have to do is gaze into your phone and endlessly scroll through content. It's not a very demanding job. But you have to do it several hours a day to earn money for the company. Very minimal money, mind. You're getting paid nothing, of course. Otherwise it wouldn't be slavery. The company makes a fraction of a cent per hour of your scrolling work. It's a very low productivity job.

Unless you're one of the superslaves, that is. Superslaves create the content for the endless scroll. They work very hard to bring more slaves to the product, in exchange for control over the slaves they attract, which they can then sell to the highest bidder. Superslaves are still slaves. The company doesn't pay them. (But if your business is selling ad space in popular spaces, you pay the space owner space rent to show ads in space. In which case the superslaves are space landlords instead. The space land might be owned by the company though, provided to the space landlords as a freebie to entice them to create a popular space where they can sell ad space back to the company in which case the space landlords are superspaceslaves instead. Internet business models: rocket science.)

The fun part is this: the users are paid for their endless scrollwork in digital tobacco. The digital tobacco has monetary value. The users should technically declare it in their taxable income. The employer who provides the endless scrollwork to the users should list the users as their employees.

Note that this is only a problem if the employer pays the users in free services. If the company only purchases ad space and resells it to advertisers, the users are not paid by the company and there's no problem. If the users have to pay for the service provided by the company and another company can offer the service for less (but no company can offer it for free), and the users are not sold to the highest bidder, there's no problem.

If the company provides the users a free service funded by ad space on the free service, the users are employees of the company, working for the company to look at ads in the hopes that the ads persuade the users to change their behavior in a way that the advertisers pay for.
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About Me

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Built art installations, web sites, graphics libraries, web browsers, mobile apps, desktop apps, media player themes, many nutty prototypes, much bad code, much bad art.

Have freelanced for Verizon, Google, Mozilla, Warner Bros, Sony Pictures, Yahoo!, Microsoft, Valve Software, TDK Electronics.

Ex-Chrome Developer Relations.