art with code

2017-10-09

Ethereum algorithmically

Ethereum is a cryptocurrency with a mining process designed to stress random access memory bandwidth. The basic idea in mining Ethereum is to find a a 64-bit number that hashes with a given seed to a 64-bit number that's smaller than the target number.

Think of it like cryptographic lottery. You pick a number, hash it, and compare the hash to the target. If you got a hash that's below the target, you win 5 ETH.

What makes this difficult is the hashing function. Ethereum uses a hashing function that first expands the 32-byte seed into a 16 MB intermediate data structure using a memory-hard hashing function (if you have less than X bytes of RAM, the hash takes exponentially longer to compute), then expands the 16 MB intermediate data structure into a multi-gigabyte main data structure. Hashing a number generates a pseudo-random walk through the main data structure, where you do 64 rounds of "read 128 bytes from location X and update the hash and location X based on the read bytes."

While the computation part of the Ethereum hashing function isn't super cheap, it pales in comparison to the time spent doing random memory accesses. Here's the most expensive line in the Ethereum compute kernel: addToMix = mainDataStructure[X]. If you turn X into a constant, the hash function goes ten times faster.

Indeed, you can get a pretty accurate estimate for the mining speed of a device by taking its memory bandwidth and dividing it by 64 x 128 bytes = 8192 B.

Zo. What is one to do.

Maximize memory bandwidth. Equip every 4 kB block of RAM with a small ALU that can receive an execution state, do a bit of integer math, and pass the execution state to another compute unit. In 4 GB of RAM, you'd have a million little compute units. If it takes 100 ns to send 128 bytes + execution state from one compute unit to another, you'd get 1.28 PB/s aggregate memory bandwidth. Yep, that's over a million gigabytes per second.

With a million GB/s, you could mine ETH at 150 GH/s. At the moment, 25 MH/s of compute power nets you about $1 a day. 150 GH/s would be $6000 per day. If you can fab ten thousand of them, you'd make sixty million a day. Woooooinflation.


Post a Comment

Blog Archive

About Me

My photo

Built art installations, web sites, graphics libraries, web browsers, mobile apps, desktop apps, media player themes, many nutty prototypes